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Datto NAS Shares: Access Control Settings

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Topic

This article explains the access control settings for Datto NAS shares. 

Environment

  • Datto SIRIS
  • Datto NAS

Description

The Access Control List settings differ based on whether the share is NAS or iSCSI. But both use the access control settings to manage shares.

See this article For more information regarding the Access Control List.

Accessing the NAS settings

1. Open the Datto NAS GUI.

2. Click the Shares tab.

3. Select the share to configure.

4. Select Configure Share Settings.

NAS Share Settings Explanation

These settings apply to NAS shares only.

Make Share Public/Private

Click this button to switch between public or private access for the share. 

To back up a Mac via TimeMachine/AFP, the share must be private.

Figure 1: Public / Private toggle (click to enlarge)

Add User to Share

This feature is used to add users to the share. The list displays all device users, minus the users that are already assigned to the share.

Check the Add as admin box to enable administrative rights for the user.

Figure 2: Add user to share (click to enlarge)

Manage Share Users

Use this setting to add and remove users, or modify user permissions. Figure 3: Manage Share Users (click to enlarge)

Other Share Options

  • Enable Write Access for All Users: This setting changes the default setting of write access from Creator Only (WACO) to Write Access for All (WAA).
  • Enable SFTP, AFP/Time Machine, NFS: Enable the protocols that you want to use to access this share.
Datto NAS shares do not support FTP. SFTP is supported. 

Figure 4: Other Share Options (click to enlarge)

iSCSI Share Settings

The only Access Control List setting for iSCSI shares is CHAP Authentication.

Figure 5: CHAP Authentication (click to enlarge)

CHAP provides two levels of security:

  • One-way CHAP authentication: Only the remote client (the initiator) needs to provide a password to start a login session with the share (the target).
  • Mutual CHAP authentication: Requires that both the client (the initiator) and the share (the target) authenticate each other.

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